Meet Our New Summer Intern At Gabhart Investments

Meet Our New Summer Intern At Gabhart Investments

 

Blake Imperl – 22 Year Old Aspiring Commercial Real Estate Professional

 

Background

I moved from Milwaukee to Scottsdale, Arizona when I was 5 years old. Spending my formidable years in the desert climate, I always had dreams of moving to the beach. As the son of a former real estate developer, I was exposed to real estate from a young age. My dad specialized in multi-family and student housing developments in and around the Milwaukee area. Upon graduating high school at 18, I moved to San Diego to study marine biology at San Diego State University. I quickly realized I wasn’t cut out for the science world and changed my focus to pre-business. It wasn’t until my sophomore year that I decided I wanted to be a management major with a real estate minor. I accredit this route to the all inspiring business professors I had at SDSU and to my involvement with The Real Estate Society. As a person who thrives on leadership and entrepreneurial opportunities, the knowledge and values I acquired during my time at SDSU will serve me for the rest of my career. Outside of real estate, I am an avid musician who plays in a local indie rock band called Stray Monroe. We’ve had the fortune of playing at some great venues around San Diego including The Casbah and Soda Bar and have also been played on 91X and 94.9FM. I also enjoy traveling, spending time with my girlfriend, and practicing Portuguese.

 

Why did you choose to intern with Gabhart Investments?

I chose to intern with Gabhart investments for several reasons. First, Curtis seems to have an amazing drive and motivation to succeed. From the first time we met, I could sense that he carries himself to a high level of professionalism with an immense entrepreneurial spirit. Though I had been exposed to commercial real estate before meeting with him, I never entertained the idea of making it into a possible career. He definitely opened up my eyes to all the opportunities that could be had in commercial. Second, Curtis is a very generous person who gives back to the real estate community. His involvement with past interns, students, and aspiring professionals, really spoke volumes to me. I sensed that if I gave it my all during this internship that I would get a lot back. Lastly, I really liked the opportunity to learn in a small team environment. I felt that I would get a great deal of hands-on experience and intangible knowledge.

How did you hear about the internship?

I heard about this internship through my former boss, Randy Zimnoch, who is the owner of Realty National. Realty National is an investor-friendly and full-service brokerage based out of Pacific Beach. They’ve developed a stellar team of over 30 agents since their inception in 2011. Randy was crucial in setting me on the career path that I am on now. Without his guidance, I think my focus in real estate would have been entirely different.

Why would you work for free?

Knowledge is invaluable. What I will be learning over the course of this internship far outweighs any minute compensation I could currently earn elsewhere. I realized early on in my college education that you can’t monetize the value of experience, because it’s that very experience which will make you more money down the line. In my initial meeting with Curtis, he asked me about my professional goals. One of the things I told him was that it was a personal goal to be a millionaire by the time I’m 30. He told me through hard work, smart decisions, determination, and a bit of luck that it could be possible. This isn’t to say I anticipate real estate being a get-rich-quick process; I fully understand you need to be in for the long-haul. Judging by how successful he has been thus far, I think it’s safe to say I’m learning from somehow who could teach me some things on how to make that possible.

What are you trying to accomplish?

It is my goal to walk out this internship a much stronger professional that I was before. I will achieve this by applying myself and acting like a sponge of knowledge. I want to understand the commercial arena better and pick up on some things that have made Curtis so successful. I’d like to also understand how I can hit the ground running upon graduation in December of this year. It is my hope that I can add many invaluable tools to my real estate belt that I will be able to utilize for years to come. Lastly, and most importantly, I want to add as much value as I can to Gabhart Investments.

Why is it you are interested in Real Estate?

I touched on this early, but I attribute my interest in real estate to my father and The Real Estate Society at SDSU. From a young age, I remember walking properties with my dad, doing napkin math, and talking real estate. Though I may not have realized it at the time, he was planting the seeds that would eventually grow into a profound interest. Once I got involved with The Real Estate Society in my sophomore year, I began to apply a lot of those concepts my dad and I initially discussed. I went to every guest speaker event, every case study, networked, took notes, and constantly worked on my professional development. I also served as Director of Marketing during my third year and this past year I was Vice President on the executive board. Lastly, I need to thank my many mentors who have helped me along the way; David Smith, Sean Bascom, Kris Kopensky, Mark Goldman, Mike Wolfe, Cody Zindroski, Jessica Barber, and many others. Their support and knowledge have proved to be invaluable.

 

I will be making monthly posts on my progress here at Gabhart Investments, how my views are changing in regards to real estate, and any other new updates. Stay posted!

In a bit,

Blake Imperl

San Diego Multi-Family Deal Maker Of The Year Winner

San Diego Multi-Family Deal Maker Of The Year Winner

Winner of the San Diego Business Journal Top Real Estate Deals of 2014

“My team represented the owner and closed the deal from multiple offers, at the full asking price of $4.7 million. That selling point was one of the highest recorded price-per-unit sales in Golden Hill.”

I was honored and humbled when I recently won the prestigious San Diego Business Journals Deal Maker of the Year Award for best Multi-Family with the sale of El Dorado Manor in Golden Hill and also won for the top Retail Deal of the Year for the sale of the San Ysidro Swap Meet.

I wanted to take few moments to share with you the details of the apartment transaction in hopes that it will provide you with some ideas for transactions you may be involved in.  The deal presented was the successful sale of a 22 unit multi-family property located just east of downtown San Diego in the Golden Hill neighborhood. My team represented the owner and closed the deal from multiple offers, at the full asking price of $4.7 million. That selling point was one of the highest recorded price-per-unit sales in Golden Hill.     

This story began in 2005 when I originally teamed up with the Seller for a project to put a subdivision tract map on the property.  The Seller’s original plan was to either develop the property himself or sell it as a package to a condo conversion specialist. That plan was dealt a challenge when the City of San Diego was served with a lawsuit by a private group whose aim was to stop Condo Conversion projects.

2404-c-street-001_web

Front shot of the 22 unit golden hill apartment building for sale

With over 180 projects across the city paralyzed by pending litigation, I swiftly assembled the team necessary to start a non-profit 2014-07-10_21-35-13foundation providing legal leadership to all the affected property owners.  The Foundation’s actions soon gathered many of the Owners together and successfully removed them from the lawsuit.  However, the larger issue was a lack of defined and realistic civic regulation covering this type of real estate transaction.

EL Dorado logo

logo that was created as part of the marketing campaign

I employed the resources of the foundation to continue its mission beyond this first success. The involvement of all parties – City, Owners, Realtors, and Citizens – was the key to the creation of new condominium conversion regulations for the City of San Diego.  My continued involvement in the lawsuit conversations and its successful resolution meant that condominium conversion would continue to be one of many sources of affordable home ownership for San Diegans.

Unfortunately, the delays encountered in addressing the lawsuit prevented the owner of the Golden Hill property from selling at the most opportune time, at the peak of the market for this property type.  Not to be dissuaded, I continued to meet regularly over the years with the Owner, analyzing market trends and data. Incorporated into this strategy was attention to the existing tentative condominium map so that it did not lose value through expiration.

Golden Hill Apartment SummaryIn 2012 and 2013 the meetings included a new, thorough financial analysis. The Owner and I focused on three viable scenarios for the property:

  • Owner to proceed with the Condominium Conversion himself
  • Owner and Agent (Myself) to enter into a joint venture to complete the Condominium Conversion
  • Owner to sell the property as it existed (multi-family apartments).

Additionally, my research addressed these issues:

  • Tax basis and tax consequences for the Owner
  • The potential tax liabilities of the Owner doing the Conversion directly
  • The value of the property in a 1031 exchange as  condominiums or as apartments

After 10 + years of ownership, trading out this property in the Owner’s portfolio would require a very attractive replacement and the confidence that I would be able to locate it.  Our carefully considered conclusion was to list the property as an apartment building with the still-viable tentative condominium map included in the transaction.

With the Owner’s blessing, I selected an ambitious price point, which was the highest per unit price of any listing in Golden Hill.  This created a fresh challenge – overcoming resistance to the number by clearly illustrating the supporting values.

Through my research of current and historic rents in the desirable neighborhood, I revealed support for aggressive pricing, indicating viable prospects for the property.  A detailed list and photographs of comparable buildings in the area was compiled to show buyers what was being offered to apartment seekers at that price point.  Additionally, I invested in large-scale, photo-realistic renderings of the 2404-c-street-039_webproperty, illustrating its potential for renovation as a condominium project able to compete with pricier options in nearby Downtown San Diego. Packaged into a video format, the information was easily communicated to potential Buyers and their Realtors. This action enlarged the pool of potential buyers, with more agents and clients able to understand in visual terms the scope of possibilities and value being presented.

C Street Rendering

a rendering that was made for the marketing of the apartment building

 

The historic high price point per unit was supported and accepted, evidenced by the reception of multiple offers on the property.  My persistence throughout a 10-year relationship and innovation created value and resulted in a successful transaction at full asking price for the Seller. My understanding of all facets of the transaction was invaluable in assisting the Buyer’s agent in compilation of the multitude of documents into a comprehensible format for the Buyer.

A final level of complexity had to be negotiated. The transaction needed to be completed within a specific one-week window of opportunity.  The ability to do this in coordination with the Buyer’s Broker allowed the Buyer to fulfill the requirements of their 1031 exchange at the same time the Seller did the same for their 1031 transaction. Additionally the sale was carefully timed so that the Seller avoided a significant pre-payment penalty.

Follow the link for the full marketing package https://gii.box.com/goldenhillapartmentforsale

Link to property website www.2404cstreet.com

Stay tuned for our case study of The San Ysidro Swap Meet which we won Deal Maker of the Year for.

GABHART INVESTMENTS COMPLETES MULTI-PROPERTY FUND AND RETURNS 24% ANNUALIZED TO INVESTORS

For Immediate Release

SAN DIEGO, Release Date – Gabhart Investments Inc. sold the last property in its first micro fund, Gabhart Real Estate Opportunity Fund Series 1, LLC. The fund was invested in the purchase, rehabilitation and sale of multiple single-family homes over a 13-month period.

The homes were located throughout San Diego County with resale prices ranging from $250,000 to $500,000. All of the properties were bank-owned or short sale purchases with rehabilitation costs ranging from $30,000 to $100,000.

 

Gabhart Investments is currently managing three active funds focused entirely on 1-4 unit residential properties. “Our strategy with the funds is to minimize risk for our investors by purchasing multiple properties in each fund located in different sub-markets throughout Southern California. Investors benefit from an average of profits from several projects and they are also insulated from a lapse in one sub-market”, says Curtis Gabhart, CEO.

 

The investor partners in Fund 1 achieved a 22% to 26% (24% average) annual internal rate of return on their capital depending on their investment date. One of the many unique features of the fund is that as each property sells, investors receive a portion of their capital allocated to that project along with estimated profits. “This structure is attractive to our investor partners as it provides short-term cash flow and allows them to reinvest back into another fund or invest elsewhere,” says Nick Walsh, investment manager.

 

Gabhart Investments is currently partnering with multiple investors in their Series 5 fund. “We’re interested in working with partners that understand our current business plan and share our longer-term goal of expanding into new markets and investments. For example, we are in the process of creating a new fund to invest in first trust deeds within our niche market to provide investors with monthly cash flow and an alternative to our equity partnerships,” says Gabhart.

About Gabhart Investments Inc.
Gabhart Investments Inc., headquartered in San Diego, Calif., is a real estate investment and advisory firm specializing in the fundraising of micro funds for the investments of distressed single & multi-family residences in Southern California. www.gabhartinvestments.com

 

 

 

***The information within this site does not constitute an offer to sell or a solicitation of an offer to buy any securities. Financial results are un-audited company estimates only and are not necessarily indicative of future results which may vary substantially from those set forth herein.

 

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Due diligence list to use when purchasing an apartment building

Multi-Family Due Diligence Request List

 

Here is a list to use that should help you with your due diligence when buying apartment buildings. Below are some of the things to request from the seller of a multifamily property.

I decided to post this list because of a comment I received on a previous posting. I did named data collection and income & expense analysis of apartment buildings (click here to read that post).

Here is an excerpt from his comment

Remember that the SELLER always LIES so NEVER ever rely on the seller to give you accurate numbers. Do your own research that way you only have your self to pat on the back!!!

Below is a list of items I use (in San Diego) that you will want to request from the apartment buildings seller and/or broker listing the property.

Due Diligence Request List

1. Annual profit and loss statements (P&Ls) past 3 years; one year of monthly P&Ls

2. Rent roll and leases including term, deposit, and payment history, Section-8 housing documents, if any

3. Tax returns (last 2 years)

4. Receipts of utility bills (water, gas, trash, sewer, electric, etc for last 12 months) or recap report from provider showing usage and cost

5. Any service or advertising contracts: (Trash, extermination, maintenance, management, commission agreements, union agreements, vending, billboard, pay telephone, etc. and any instrument or contract to be assumed by Purchaser)

6. Copies of all appraisals, engineering reports, termite reports, environmental reports

7. Insurance claims history for last 5 years (can be obtained from insurance agent)

8. List and receipts of any major repairs done in the last 5 years (paint, fence, remodel, roof, water heater, etc)

9. Insurance policy including all riders, risk assessments, and disclosure affidavit for carrier

10. Architectural and engineering plans and specifications (if available)

11.  Payroll register: List of employees including name, position, wage rate, and entitled benefits

12.  Business license

13.  Litigation History: details of any past or pending litigation (if none, then affidavit from owner)

14. Environmental Inspection and Survey, if readily available: Key Issues: Asbestos, Lead Paint, underground tanks, wetlands

15.  Warranties: existing warranties from roofers, contractors, etc. (passed to the new owner if possible).

16. Schedule of Furniture and Fixtures

 

 

(more…)

Data Collection and Income & Expense Analysis of Apartment Buildings

Data Collection and Income & Expense Analysis of Apartment Buildings

Here is the first post in many to come on analyzing residential income properties. This is directly from my course on property valuation and analysis which I will be discussing more of in my upcoming class on Buying and Selling Apartment buildings.

Learning Objectives of this Post on Analyzing Apartment Buildings and Residential Income Properties: Data Collection and Income & Expense Analysis

  1. Identify sources of data
  2. Describe the components of an income & expense sheet
  3. Understand how to arrive at Net Operating Income from Gross Scheduled Income

The first step to accurately determine the market value of a real estate investment is a solid program of data collection and analysis. Each property will have its own unique considerations

All should at least begin with

  •  Property type
  •  Overall condition of the improvements
  •  Type of construction
  •  Neighborhood analysis
  •  Overall market conditions
  • Income and expense analysis
  • Legal requirements, zoning etc
  • Comparable property data

This list is broad in scope, but it’s a good foundation for the data collection plan. The data collected from the market on comparable type property will be used to determine the appropriate capitalization (CAP)  rate and make market comparisons in a later step. The next step is the actual collection of the data.

Data Sources

The data required for the analysis is obtained from many of the same sources as the information used in residential sales:

  •  Owners records
  •   Multiple listing service (MLS), Costar, Loopnet, Commercial Agents & Property Owners  Public
  • records
  • Census data
  • Chamber of Commerce
  • Local Housing Authority
  • Appraisers
  • Trade associations
  • Local Council of Governments
  • Tax assessment records

This should give you an idea of a few of the possible sources of data and the steps to begin the data collection process. Once the data has been collected the next step is the analysis of the data.

The Operating Report (Profit and Loss Statement)

When analyzing a real estate investment, we begin with an existing operating statement, also known as a profit and loss statement. The operating report will consist of both income and expense items attributable to the property. In the first step of the analysis we will only be concerned with the cash income and expense of the property. We will consider depreciation and other non-cash benefits in a subsequent calculation.

Gross Scheduled Income

The gross scheduled income is the amount of money that the property would produce on an annual basis if it were fully occupied. Included in gross scheduled income would be any income attributable to the property from non rent sources.

What types of sources can be included for determining gross scheduled income?

These sources could include income from laundry and vending machines, parking and storage fees, as well as other owner operated concessions.

When analyzing the gross income, consideration is given not only to the existing rents being charged, called contract or current rent, but also economic or market rent, which is the rent the property would command if it were available for rent in the current market. An adjustment can be made to the gross income if the market indicates that market rent differs from the actual rent. If such an adjustment is made, that should be plainly noted on the operating statement (see loss to lease).


Vacancy & Collection Losses and Effective Gross Income

The chief component in the calculation of effective gross income is the vacancy and collection loss rate. Most properties are not expected to remain fully rented for the entire period of ownership. When a tenant vacates, often there is at least some rental income lost during the turn over period due to repair or remodeling time. In addition to this consideration, one must face the reality that there may be a situation where a tenant becomes unable or unwilling to pay rent as agreed. In this circumstance there will be some rental income lost.

The vacancy and collection loss is usually expressed as a percentage of the gross annual rental income. There are several generally accepted methods for determining the amount of the vacancy and collection loss

  •  Historical data on the subject property
  • Published figures for the community
  • Market analysis

Other places to get historical operating data is

None of these things by themselves will probably give you a 100% complete picture but combining different resources the picture will become much clearer.

Historical data and market analysis are perhaps the most accurate, because typically published figures for the community are an average, and may not be representative of the property you are analyzing. Once the appropriate rate has been developed, the loss is subtracted from Gross Scheduled Income to derive at Effective Gross Income.

Example:
Gross Scheduled Income $12,000
Vacancy and Collection Loss (5%)  (600)
Effective Gross Income   $11,400

Gross Operating Income

To figure the gross operating income you go through the following steps:

Gross Scheduled Income
– Vacancy & Credit Loss
= Effective Gross Income
+ All Other Income (garage rent, laundry income, vending, etc)
= Gross Operating Income

The figure derived from this process is what we will call rental income. This is the actual income received after taking into account vacancy and credit loss against potential income.

Other income can come from a variety of sources. In apartments, it is quite often laundry, but it could be rental on furniture for furnished apartments, garages, etc.

The resulting figure of gross operating income is all the income left over after subtracting out the above mentioned items. It is your actual income in hand before expenses. Therefore it is a very important number.

Operating Expenses

The next step in the analysis process is to determine the total operating expenses for the property. Like income, expenses will be analyzed on an annual basis. The investor will do a detailed analysis of the expenses of a given property, so it benefits the practitioner to have done a thorough analysis in the beginning.

It is important to carefully analyze all categories of expenses to accurately portray the financial condition of the property. There are different categories of expenses, depending upon the type of property you will be analyzing, however all expenses are segregated into two basic categories, fixed expenses and variable expenses.

What are three fixed expenses and 10 variable expenses?

Fixed Expenses

A list of typical fixed expense categories will include

  •  Property taxes
  • Insurance
  • Landscaping and service contracts
  • Any expense that does not change from month to month

What determines a fixed expense is the fact that the expense will not vary in response to changing levels of occupancy.

Do not include mortgages as part of operating expenses!Mortgages are not part of operating expenses and are categorized elsewhere.

This group of expenses is not difficult to document for your analysis, but be careful to consider the fact that these expenses may not be the same for a new owner; i.e., the building insurance may go up and most likely the real estate property tax may be reassessed upon transfer.

Real Estate taxes can be one of the largest expenses so make sure to calculate any new tax increase or decrease in your analysis.

Variable Expenses

This category of expenses is much longer, and categories to consider will vary depending on the type and size of the property under analysis. This category will include all of the expenses necessary to maintain the income stream of the property and to provide agreed upon services to the tenant. To attempt a comprehensive list of all expense categories for all types of properties might be impossible and, certainly, is beyond the scope of our study. We will discuss the more common types of expenses in some detail, remembering that each property has unique characteristics and may include its own unique expense categories.

Off-Site Management

Many properties will be managed completely by off-site personnel. The cost of off-site management is determined and subtracted as an expense of operation. It should be noted that a management expense is a valid deduction from income even if the owner is managing the property. There are many firms specializing in this field; they usually charge between 4% and 10% of the rental amount.

 Payroll On-Site Personnel

Resident management is used when the day to day activities of the property require constant supervision. A resident manager is sometimes given free or reduced rent. If that is the case, you must include the managers unit rent in gross scheduled income, then enter the amount of free rent as an expense. In California, if a property has 16 or more units it is the law to have a resident manager on site.

 Expenses/Benefits

This would be for other management costs. For instance, office and administrative expense, performance bonuses paid to an on-site manager, and any health insurance or retirement plan contributions would be listed here.

Taxes – Workers’ Compensation

Whenever there is an employee, there are various taxes the employer is responsible for. Among these are: Social security tax, unemployment tax, as well as local, state and federal income taxes. These taxes are payable by the employer, and in addition, the employer is required to withhold some amount from the employee’s pay and forward it to the IRS.

Repairs and Maintenance

This is the total amount of repairs and maintenance necessary for the year. This would not include any money spent on capital improvements. A capital improvement is any improvement which substantially increases the useful life of the property. If you find a property which has not had any maintenance expense in the recent past, you will probably find a trade off in the overall condition of the property.

Utilities

This is probably the most difficult portion of the operating statement to complete accurately. This information is most easily obtained from the owner. NOTE: If the owner is paying the utility bills and is then reimbursed by the tenant, the full utility cost will be listed here and the amount reimbursed to the owner would be listed as other income (this is referred to as R.U.B.).

Accounting and Legal

This is the amount for the bookkeeping required on the property. It will include any amounts paid for payroll reporting or for monthly profit and loss statements. This should also include any legal expenses associated with evictions, drafting of leases, etc.

Advertising, Licenses and Permits

Many larger properties will have ongoing advertising expenses. At the very least there will be some cost at each vacancy. This includes the amount spent for advertising, as well as any licenses or permit charges; e.g., city business license, pool inspections, and/or housing code inspections.

Supplies

This might include supplies for the vendors mentioned previously: Bug spray, batteries for smoke detectors etc.

Miscellaneous

That’s right! There should always be a category for those expenses too insignificant to warrant their own category. This would include any additional expenses which were not accounted for elsewhere in the analysis.

 Contract Services

These are services which are supplied by outside vendors not already accounted for under fixed expense categories. These are additional services such as maintenance contracts, design services, appraisals and as many others as necessary.

Here is a list of the more common expenses in alphabetical order. Some of them we list without explanation because they are rather obvious:

  • Accounting and Legal expense
  • Advertising
  • Gas
  • Insurance
  • Licenses and permits
  • Miscellaneous and other expenses Property Insurance
  • (Property) Management
  • Payroll and Workers Compensation
  • Real Property Taxes
  • Repairs and Maintenance
  • Services
  • Sewer
  • Supplies
  • Telephone
  • Utilities (Such as the electric bill)
  • Water

Total Operating Expenses

This is the total of the expenses calculated. This is not to include vacancy or credit losses. Remember that what we are attempting is to give as accurate a picture as possible of the property’s financial condition. The property’s value will be dependent upon the ability to produce income, so it is important to be as accurate as possible in estimating both income and expenses.
The total operating expenses are now subtracted from the effective gross income.

Example:
Effective Gross Income $11,400
Total Operating Expenses (4,500)
Net Operating Income $ 6,900

Net Operating Income (NOI)

The net income that a property is capable of producing will be one of the first indicators of the worth of an investment. Later when we begin to apply the capitalization rate to the property, the NOI will be used to estimate total investment value.

The calculation of the net operating income does not take into consideration the effect of any potential financing of the property. This may seem odd at first, but in consideration, it will not take long to realize that the property should have a value that is completely independent of any financing that an investor might use to acquire that property.

Measure NOI correctly in order to properly value property

NOI is arrived at as follows:

Gross Operating Income
– Operating Expenses
– Capital Expenditures
Net Operating Income

Sales Proceeds

The sales proceeds that come from divesting yourself of a property are as follows:

Sales Price
– Selling Expenses
= Net Sales Proceeds
– Adjusted Basis _
= Taxable Gain
– Depreciation _
= Capital Gain / Loss


Data Analysis

Having discussed the income and expense analysis in detail, we will concentrate on the balance of the data and other considerations. The property will be analyzed for the following:

  •  Income quantity
  • Income quality
  • Income durability
  • Special risks

All of these considerations will be compared to other investments available in order to determine the appropriate rate of return and measures of value for the property being analyzed.

Test Your Knowledge: Data Collection and Income & Expense Analysis Questions

1. What is the chief component in the calculation of effective gross income?

2. How do you come to Effective Gross Income?

3. Circle the following that are considered an operating expense:

Property taxes Insurance The owner’s income taxes
Mortgage debt service Payroll taxes Utilities
Property maintenance

4. How do you arrive at NOI from Gross Operating Income

5. How do you arrive at the capital gain / loss from the sales price?

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