Multi-Family Quick Tips When Doing An Exterior Inspection

Multi-Family Quick Tips When Doing An Exterior Inspection

By: Curtis Gabhart, CCIM

Here is a quick recap of some things I look for when doing a quick inspection of an apartment building or even a single family home and common issues I come across.

I like to do a quick review to the outside condition of the property in order to gain insight as to whether it warrants further consideration for purchase or investment.

Now, before getting into the details, let me summarize the most important factors regarding the physical condition of a property.

Some of the important visible considerations are:

  • Reviewing the foundation and cement
  • Checking the siding
  • Reviewing the sprinkler systems
  • Analyzing the quality of the landscaping
  • Looking at the windows
  • Looking at the roof
  • Inspecting at the front door
  • Looking at the gas meters
  • Looking at the train gutters
  • Reviewing the quality of the paint
  • Looking at the overall neighborhood

When buying a property, whether it’s an apartment building or single-family house that you may plan on flipping, some of the concepts are going to be very similar, if not identical. With many investment properties, you will find an inside inspection is subject to an accepted offer. This means you will need to make some assumptions about the property before you submit your offer. This can prove difficult, especially when you’re not able to view the inside.

Starting Out 

I’ll look from the ground up – I’ll start by looking at the ground and taking an overall look at the condition of the property to see what level of care has been maintained. As a general rule, if it’s a piece of shit on the outside, it’s probably a piece of shit on the inside. There have been a few exceptions where I’ve been pleasantly surprised when I got inside a property, but that’s exactly what they are – exceptions. I’d use this analogy as a general rule of thumb – if you see a car that looks junky on the outside, it probably just as junky on the inside.

Foundation – I’ll look at the foundation, all the cement on the ground near the foundation, and all landscaping near the foundationI’m looking for things like sprinklers spraying on the building. I’ll then check if there is stucco peeling off the building, which can sometimes indicate moisture intrusion into the building. I’ll also check if the ground is sloping towards or away from the building; it should be sloping away from the building. If it’s sloping towards the building, it may indicate that a possibility of having a foundation or other problem that relates to water. If there’s cement, I’ll look for big cracks in the cement, which sometimes can indicate unstable soil or cracks in the foundation.

This could indicate further foundation issues

Landscaping – what is it going to cost me to improve the landscaping, what do I need to do to it, are there sprinkler systems, and are they automatic or non-automatic?

Building – what kind of siding is there? Is it stucco, brick, vinyl, wood? I pay close attention to the condition that it is in. If it’s wood, I will check for visible water or termite damage.

Eaves – Does the wood going into the eaves have damage? If there’s a lot of damage in the eaves, it very well could go into the attic rafters, which could be a lot more expensive. If it’s on the siding, what kind of siding is it? If it’s an old building, a lot of times replacing siding can get very expensive for two reasons:

the eaves is the part of the roof that meets or overhangs the walls of the building

  1. First is the fact that you may not be able to find that particular kind of siding anymore without having it specially milled.
  2. Second is anytime you pull something off an old building, you’re very likely to find unforeseen surprises. Because you can’t be certain of the magnitude of these surprises, it is safe to assume everything is going to cost you a little more than you think. Whatever you think the price is, assume it probably cost more than you originally estimated. 

 

Windows- Are they new or old? If it’s an old building, are they wood sash or aluminum windows? Is that something that’s going to need to be replaced? Typically, the double-wood-hung windows that you see in houses or old apartment buildings are not in very good condition. With aluminum windows, I essentially just look at them and decide if I’m going to replace them or not.  What you need to be aware of is in many areas where you replace these windows, there may be architecture review committees that require you to replace them with historical windows. This could prove to be very costly, especially if they are wood sash.

wood sash window

Building Corners – Does everything appear straight? If there’s siding, are the lines of the siding vertical or are they all straight? On the corners of the building, what does the wood look like? Is there stucco coming off?

Roof – Does the roof have something called a drip edge?  This is a little metal edge that goes into the lip of the shingle roof. Are there rain gutters? If there are no rain gutters, water may not have been running away from the building. Because of this, I will spend more time thoroughly inspecting the foundation.

I look at the shingles of the roof; if there are many noticeable curved edges, it is likely on its last leg. Then, if I think I may need to replace the roof, I will look at how many layers of roofing there are. Typically, you don’t want to go past two or three layers of roofing. What that means is that if you replace a roof that has two or three layers, you need to put in your budget funds to tear off that existing roof before replacing it. You also will need reserves for unexpected issues when you pull of the old roof because you may need to repair the plywood underneath. Depending on how much work you do around the roof, you may have to re-sheet it.

re-sheeting a roof

Fence  Do I need to replace or paint it? Is the fence wood? Is it leaning, does it look like it’s on my property line, does it look I could add private yards for apartment units? Many times, you will find large open areas in the back of apartments that are shared. What we can do is put up a fence around the units and now each unit has their own backyard – a very inexpensive fix that not only can help you get higher rent but can reduce costs because you may not have as much landscaping to maintain

Paint (for older buildings) – If it’s pre-1978 and you have peeling paint, you’re probably going to want to get a lead-based paint test conducted. That’s going to tell you whether you’re going to need to do any kind of abatement or work on the property. If work is needed, you may need to use lead-based paint best practices, which can prove very costly. I usually recommend getting a test. Paint used in older buildings in San Diego is less likely to have lead in it compared to the east coast, where the weather is harsh and requires more durable paint.  Most of the properties I have tested did not contain lead, but it is still important to get it tested.

If it is tested and comes back negative you do not need to follow lead based paint best practices. If you have a pre-1978 property and decide not get it tested, you still must work on it like it contains lead based paint – which is a good reason to get it tested in the first place.

peeling lead-based paint

Click here for information on lead-based paint best practices

Front Doors – Aesthetically, are they looking good? Are there any gaps? If I look at top of door, I will look for a little pie-shaped gap at the top. If this is present, it indicates there may be some settling in the property.

Meter Boxes

Meters  Is it gas or electric? Are there gas meters for all units? If the property runs on gas and there is one water heater, there should be gas meters for each unit and also for the building.If it’s a multi-unit building, I count how many individual meters there are. There should be as many individual meters as there are units, plus one additional one, which would be for the common area. If you’re missing a meter, you may have something called a bootleg property, which means one of the units may have been put in unpermitted (just something to look at).  These are important things to note because in San Diego the tax assessor will charge for all the units, and state on the public website that it is X units, but that does not necessarily mean they are legal units.

Electrical – As far as electric meters go, I’m looking at what kind of panel it is. If it’s old, it could be something called knob and tube, which could indicate that I’m going to have to put a lot of money into upgrading the electrical. This will likely increase the interior costs as well. I then look at the circuit panel – is it updated? Then, I’m looking at how many amps each unit has. Ideally, you want 100 amps, but for many apartments, you’ll have between 30-50. Newer apartments should have 100.

Knob & Tube Wiring

I’m also looking at the type of panel; Murray Lampert typically have problems, so I want to check what kind of panel there is. Are there circuits in the units? Is there any room to add additional circuits if you want to add appliances or anything else inside the property? Is the inside of the panel painted? If so, it could indicate that the previous people who worked on the property weren’t doing things the proper way. This would lead me to believe other things were not done the proper way.

This is quite the mess!

I’m looking for bunches of electrical or cable lines running all over the place. We’ve bought properties where it looks like spaghetti running all over the building, and we’ve ended up having to rip it all off and start from scratch simply because it’s easier to do instead of trying to sort it all out.

 

 

Staircases – When I walk on the stairs, I make sure to walk very heavy. I’m looking to see if it seems squishy. Is termite damage visible, are the railings stable? In compliance with code, railing spacing should be about three and a half inches. For me, if I can make a fist or place my hand through the pickets of the railing, it is most likely not up to code and I’ll have to replace it depending on my insurance company and how bad it is. I look at the stairs to see if the tread rise and depth are consistent. It should be around 7” of rise and 11” of depth. If they are not to code they may need to be replaced.

Inconsistent stair depth

After An Inspection  Once the inspector gets into the property and finds things that I may not have found, do I decide not to buy the property? No, not at all. It just helps me to figure out what it’s going to cost to fix or if I even want to fix it, and what exactly I’m getting myself into. That’s what is critical about the inspectionYou can make a well-informed decision on the property rather than going in blindly and being surprised later.

It is naïve to think you can figure out how to hit a certain number or certain profit, or how to stay within a tight budget, without being informed of all the problems. This is valuable while I’m negotiating in the beginning. If I’m coming in lower than the initial offer, I can right away talk to them about some of these problems, which, most likely, the owners already know about but haven’t disclosed yet or many times they had no idea there were these problems which make it easier to negotiate.

Final Remarks

Keep in mind, none of this is 100%. These are just good rules of thumb when looking at a property. They have served me well to establish if an investment property warrants further investigating and analysis, and if so, what kind of offer to submit. This obviously isn’t everything. I depend on inspection in most cases. I will be posting an interior walk through an article in the weeks that follow. I’m interested to hear your story and what else you may look at when walking a property. Please share your take in the comments below.

**Disclaimer** – make sure you are walking the property with the consent of the current owner. Please keep in mind we are in the San Diego market and practices in your area may be different.  I highly reccommend you get a building inspector to look at the property unless you are highly confident in your ability. 

Curtis Gabhart, CCIM President Gabhart Investments, Inc.

Edited By Blake Imperl, our newest intern at Gabhart Investments. Check out his Linkedin page by clicking here.


Gabhart InvestmentsGabhart Investments, INC. (GII) is a privately held real-estate investment firm based in San Diego, California. We operate in a rapid paced project driven environment.  The employees at Gabhart Investments, INC. (GII) are close-knit, highly qualified professionals, possessing the necessary competence to meet our clients’ goals. GII promotes ethical balance for continuous training, leadership, and teamwork. Since 2000, GII has acquired and converted multi-family properties into condominiums throughout San Diego County. The new real-estate market has presented us with many opportunities to take advantage of. Along with our equity partners, Gabhart began to grow its portfolio in, arguably, the strongest housing market in the country. Thus, we consistently generate superb risk-adjusted rates of return for our investors. In 2005, Gabhart’s private investment portfolio had transactions in excess of 40 million dollars.  We intend to accelerate our business model by maintaining our focus within the purchasing and rehabilitation of bank owned real-estate property. Our additional services include consulting, brokerage, venture funding, development, construction management as well as property and asset management.

Check out our other blog posts here

Renette Project Has Been Completed!

Renette Project Has Been Completed!

We are pleased to announce that our four brand new houses in El Cajon have been completed!

The price of each house of our four newly built homes ranges from $525,000 to $550,000.

These four homes have two types of floor plan.

Plan 1 has 3 bedrooms + 1 optional / 2.5 Bath. Plan 2 has 4 bedrooms/3 bath. (Scroll down for a copy of the floor plan)

Each house features color-coordinated exterior palettes (for stucco, trim, shutters & slate tile), decorative wrought iron, faux wood & composite shutters, double-paned Low E2 white vinyl windows & patio doors, backyard w/ gated wood privacy fencing, water-saving landscape plants, open concept floor plans, 2-car garage and many more. Structural defect warranty is offered for ten years from the date of sale.

Additional parking spots for guests are available.

_MG_7835

Interior designs and features include 9-foot ceilings (both upstairs & downstairs), upgraded baseboard & casing, two-tone designer paint package, upgraded oil rubbed bronze finishes (plumbing, lighting &
hardware), bonus space under stairs storage & coat closets, rain shower heads & post faucets, pendant lighting in kitchen & baths, vessel lavatory sinks, TV & Cable Prewire; CAT5E & RJ45 jacks, with MDU Network Hub, hook-ups for washer and dryer and many more.

The kitchen features solid quartz countertop, island w/ counter top seating, white shaker cabinets w/ lazy susan organizer, soft closing doors/drawers & dovetail drawers, high-rise kitchen faucet, upper-end, energy star stainless steel appliances & many more.

Contact us at 858-356-5973 for a complete list of upgrades.

Check out our virtual walkthrough!

Click here for a virtual walkthrough for Floor Plan 1.

Click here for a virtual walkthrough for Floor Plan 2.

 

Address: 335 W Renette Ave, El Cajon, CA 92020

Floor Plan Type: Plan 1 – 3 bedroom + 1 optional / 2.5 Bath

Building Size: 1,678 SF

Lot Size: 2,772 SF

Address: 323 W Renette Ave, El Cajon, CA 92020

Floor Plan Type: Plan 2 – 4 bedroom/3 Bath

Building Size: 1,885 SF

Lot Size: 2,763 SF

Floor Plan 1

Plan 1 has 3 bedrooms + 1 optional / 2.5 Bath.

Slide1

Slide2

 

Floor Plan 2

Plan 2 has 4 bedrooms/3 bath.

Slide1

Slide2

 

Contact us at 858-356-5973 if you need more information.

Closed on a new deal in Santee

Closed on a new deal in Santee

Well it seems a lot of our hard work is starting to pay off. We will close on about 5 properties this month if everything closes on time (never does).

Our most recent acquisition is a 3 bedroom 2 bath with a converted garage in the Carlton Hills section of Santee.

We plan on turning the converted garage into another master bedroom and bath by adding a 2 car garage to the side of the house. By adding the 2 car garage we will not only get a garage we will also be able to add 400 sq. ft to the house.

We were turned onto this REO deal before it hit the market but since the lender/seller required  the listing agent to only look at offers from owner occupied for the first 15 days we decided not to put in an offer.

Fast forward about 3 months we were introduced to someone who had it under contract because the FHA buyer who had it under contract for >$230,000 backed out due to foundation issues (which we have already fixed for $13,500).

We gave them a $13,000 + wholesale fee (includes listing it on the back end for us) and closed on the deal for $175,000 last week.

I just wanted to update anyone who cared and will be putting more information as we go.

Here are some pictures of this little gem

Esparta

I also created a single property website in which I will be updating much more information than on the blog here. Please let me know if you like the site I created and what I can do to improve on it. In the meantime check out our construction budget, pro-formas, pictures & videos.

Here is a picture of the start screen, click here to go to the Esparta website

Here are initial numbers for this project.

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Aloha to our little friend… We have San Diego city approval

Aloha to our little friend… We have San Diego city approval

Hello to my little friend….

Say hello to our little friend! We have approval from the city to add square footage to the Aloha house and are in the construction phase as we speak.

I want to apologize for not posting more but we have 5 properties that we are buying this month

Been busier than a one legged ass kicker

and have been as busy as one-legged  man in an ass kickin contest.

In addition my wife and I are in Mexico for my best friend’s wedding until next Monday.

It was a much needed break and thanks to technology there is quite a bit I can actually do while gone but it really comes down to teamwork and poor Nick is grinding it out in the office while I start my first leg of my trip at our ocean front suite with a jacuzzi on the balcony, at the all-inclusive resort called dreams Puerto Vallarta.

Upstairs “rec room” at Rolando flip

When we got Shannon aka Aloha house under contract we noticed that the city records had only 2 bedroom 2 baths and 1775 square feet even though there was clearly another room above the garage.

This and the fact that the rear of the property was obviously added onto at some point made us go to the city to do a little more research since we were not willing to buy a 2 bedroom for the price we were under contract for.

We were fortunate enough to have a co-operative (bank) seller who gave us permission in writing to go down to the city to pull permits (the County of San Diego will not let you pull building records without the owner’s permission and many lenders specifically state in their contract that you agree not to contact the city about the property.

Brad went down to the city and once he got through the usual red tape and double talk was able to find out that in fact the whole structure was permitted. And

Sample building record in the city of san diego

copy of San Diego flip building record

even better news was the fact that 1775 square feet did not include the room above the garage but that the room above the garage WAS permitted as a 320sq. ft. rec room.

Since the rec room was not under the same roof it did not count towards the square footage and was considered just a rec. room.

So long story short and a bunch of time in between we found out that the only way to permit the room above the garage and turn it into a bedroom was to attach it under the same roof..

Well since the seller stated they were selling a 3 bedroom 2.5 bath when it was really a 2/2 we pulled out the old 1,2 punch hail mary. ( We told our agent up front that we were not going to buy it for the price. We were under contract for because of the reasons above and let him know that we could either back out or try to get a credit but didn’t want to jeopardize his relationship with the other agent. He said let’s go for it).

Okay here is the 1,2  punch which is risky in the sense that you will spend some money, time and potentially lose the deal. (I told the agent up front that I was not buying this deal for the price. We were under contract for so this was not a surprise to him.)

  1. Get a professional building inspection

We get inspections on many projects before we buy them because It does a few things

  • Sees things that I may miss
  • Helps me come up with a list of items that are easy to fix but can scare buyers. I add this to my scope of work and I require my contractor to have these items fixed before his last payment. I bring the inspector out one more time before I put it on the market and make sure the work the contractor did was okay and have the inspector sign off that I completed the work.
  • I give the building inspection and my termite report to any buyers before I let them put in an offer, that way they can’t come back and say they want a $5,000 credit because the electrical is not grounded. By giving them the BIR they already know this before they put in the offer. Remember a buyer can negotiate the price down at multiple stages, as a seller you get one shot, once you’re property is tied up the price never goes up.

2. Get a bid on the work that needs to be done in writing from a contractor, submit any information you gathered from the city the sellers maybe didn’t know about (now they need to disclose this info to the next buyer since they now know about it) and justify a price reduction.

This is risky because it takes a lot of time to do it correctly and not just look like your a grinder which only pisses people off and will make them say no, just because they think you are full of it!

So we submitted a bid and in addition Nick wrote a great letter (since he is smarter than me) demonstrating the reduction in value a 2/2 has as opposed to a 3/2

The letter we wrote to the bank asking for a credit

(about $14 per foot over the last 1o years). Here is a quick snipit asking for a $40,000 credit.

Okay so I digress (I write like I think. All over the place so bear with me).

We submitted to the city with plans to add 2 bedrooms (by adding closets to the œrec room above the garage and to the dining room since there was plenty of room to make a living/dining room) and one bathroom to the œrec room.

Well we got approval just after Christmas. By adding 2 walls, 40 square feet of roof and $6,000 dollars / $11 per sq. ft. we were able to go from 1775 sq. ft to almost 2,300. Not bad considering the average price per square foot is over $250 in the area.

Next time, I’ll tell you about some of our new projects and some pretty cool stuff we are doing including another place that we are able to get about 500 sq. feet added just by adding a garage which will give us about $100,000 in extra value!

Stay tuned to the same bat channel and no particular time except when this one toothed man in a corn-on-the-cob eating contest dude gets around to updating this site.

12 hours and I’m off to our second leg in our adventure, Cabo for our friends 40th birthday!

Updated floor plan

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Falcon Flip Update – The Eagle Has Landed

Falcon Flip Update – The Eagle Has Landed

So we finally got through plan check from the city (huge relief since our Falcon project in Mission Hills got stuck in the bureaucratic spin cycle because of a little plant called Artemisia californica or better known as coastal sage brush which I will now just refer to as an expensive weed. This expensive weed was found on the cities property next to ours on the hillside and because no one at the city could seem to agree on how to move forward.

The options they were giving us were not acceptable especially since we were not even touching anything within a 100 feet of this little frigging plant. The only exterior work we were doing on the back of the property (where the hillside is) is some work on the decks which are already existing.

This has definitely been an interesting project and quite the learning process. On every project you learn something and some times those lessons cost more than others.

I am not sure what I could have done different on this project. We were able to get a great deal on this buying it at $305,000 when the average price in the area is above $700,000, but that price came with strings attached.

Here are some things that we have come up against.

As some of you may or may not remember the reason this property was so cheap is the city put a lien against the property due to code violations.

The previous owner started a big remodel including

  • New electric & Plumbing
  • Siding
  • Decking
  • Flooring
  • Framing

But like many back yard weekend warriors you could tell some of the work was questionable at best.

Hey it’s so easy to flip real estate even a cave man can do it.

To make sure we knew what we were getting into (or at least have a decent idea of what we were looking at) we met the inspector at the property (multiple times) who put the violations on Falcon.

The inspector seemed very helpful and walked myself , contractor, architect (different times) through the property  and pointed out what he wanted fixed. Some of these items were…

  • Electrical & Pluming – make sure it was to code and fix what wasn’t
  • Wanted the decks engineered to make sure they were OK
  • Check the roof and some beams
  • Replace some windows that were removed
  • A handful of miscellaneous items

Well even though it wasn’t April, the joke was on me. The first thing the city did when we submitted (as per the cities guidelines) our plans from the architect was to ask for additional items (it seemed like every time we submitted someone asked us to add something else. I think there was a contest at the city to see who could get us to make the most changes and different times).

What made this difficult is every time they asked for something new we had to scramble for someone to get it done as a priority. Below are some of the items that were asked of us, piece meal (It would have made more sense to me to have just given me the list from the start. But what do I know they need to stay busy to justify those big pensions right)

  1. Submitted set of plans of our modifications the city suggested. Hired an architect to do this
  2. They then asked us to get a surveyor to survey the property lines – week later re submitted
  3. Wanted additional engineering – week later submit
  4. Oh, now you want a landscape architect and a biologist to call out EVERY plant on our property and 100 feet past in all directions and onto the cities land…. Oh, sure why not that makes sense since we are doing what to the landscape? Oh, you also want us to actually draw, diagram and show the placement of each plant… Yeah no problem, just let me know if you would like me to re-pave the street for the city while I am doing this extra work. A few weeks later
  5. Oh, you have coastal sage brush on our city property… tisk tisk…
  6. Fast forward months of back and forth,  Tug-a-war between different people in the city telling us to do different things. Different interpretations, more submittable to the city, tweaks, and finally the legal has landed we are through plan check and now just need to get this thing finished and hope we don’t run into any more major problems like we have already.

Here is a brief rundown of where we are at and what happened.

 

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ALOHA TO OUR LATEST FLIP

ALOHA TO OUR LATEST FLIP

As they say on Hawaii Five-O “ Book-em Danno”!

Construction is starting as soon as our plans are approved from the city.

This was the 2nd house fund 2 purchased. Property 1 was the Ocean Beach house. Ok so this deal seems to have come directly from Hawaii, we paid $323,000 cash for this 1775 square foot tropical wonderland.
In addition there is a huge 320 square foot bonus room above the garage that is not counted towards the square footage. In addition to the 3 fountains, there are 2 extra rooms not counting a bonus room and a huge lot

Upon entering what appears the front door you come into a  tropical courtyard with coy pond and a sitting area with an outdoor fireplace.

The master bedroom & bath is about 600 square feet that is already pretty much remodeled.

To top it off the shower is a friggin jungle (seriously check out the picture of the shower on the picture to the left!)

To top off the bad boy Jurassic park shower there are two friggin separate private toilets in the master bath for those couples who never want to be apart (see video below – it may take a second to load)

The Love Toilet – For those couples who never want to be apart

LOCATION

It’s located in the Rolando area of San Diego only about a mile from San Diego State University (SDSU) on a great street.

We found this deal through an agent who had seen this before and sent me to take a look at it. I will post at a later time a process I use of finding deals .

Below is the floor plan with the courtyard in the center of the property


THE GRAY AREA IN THE CENTER OF THE PROPERTY IS THE COURTYARD AND CURRENTLY COVERED BY A TARP

CONSTRUCTION

Ahhh! so the question is what do we plan on doing to this place as far as improvements go right? Well it has to stay a surprise until a workshop we are holding their this Saturday from 9-12 in which we will tour the property, give a brief summary of the purchase, what sales price we hope to get and a copy of the actual existing floor plan (see above).

After that briefing I am going to discuss construction from the stand point of being an investor who is re-selling the property quickly and the process we go through on making our decisions.

  • Safe numbers to use before you ever drive the property (if you have some pictures)
  • Our initial inspection walk through sheet (you’ll be surprised at how simple this thing is and that you probably already have it) we use to give us our first idea of what needs to be done.
  • Then our quick back of the napkin cost assessment to see if it the price still pencils out before we submit the offer.
  • Creating a scope to give to a contractor.
  • Managing the process and basic tricks and traps to watch out for on these projects.
  • And then we will have everyone break off into groups, walk the property, come up with their scope of work after which we will all discuss and then we will reveal what we are doing to this project including a couple things that may surprise you.
  • If you are interested in attending RSVP me at workshop ATgabhartinvestments.com

Below is a quick video & picture collage we made of the property. I must not have had enough coffee when I filmed some of the scenes because it is a little shaky so hold on to your hats. Let me know what you think of the video.

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